World

Merkel says Islam "belongs to Germany" ahead of Dresden rally

German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses the media during a joint press conference with the Prime Minister of Turkey Ahmet Davutoglu after a meeting at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

BERLIN: Germany's Angela Merkel said on Monday Islam "belonged to Germany", in a clear repudiation of anti-immigration protesters gathering in Dresden and other cities.

A day after walking arm-in-arm with French President Francois Hollande at the front of a massive march in Paris to honour the victims of killings by Islamic militants, the chancellor received the Turkish prime minister and urged dialogue among religions.

Merkel pointed to comments made by former German president Christian Wulff, who said in 2010 that Islam was part of Germany, triggering a fierce debate.

"Former president Wulff said Islam belongs to Germany. That is true. I also hold this opinion," Merkel said at a news conference with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, who also took part in the Paris march on Sunday.

She was speaking hours before marches by a movement dubbed PEGIDA, or Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West, were due to begin in several German cities.

Such demonstrations, launched in Dresden, have been dwarfed by counter-protests. Merkel has said PEGIDA's rallies are organised by people with "hatred in their hearts".

Merkel said her government was doing everything it could to ensure migrants were being successfully integrated into German society regardless of their religion.

But she acknowledged the need for better dialogue between religions, praising Muslims for publicly rejecting the use of violence after the Paris killings and calling Turkey an ally in the fight against terrorism.

She and Davutoglu announced that their governments would begin regular German-Turkish consultations, a format in which the cabinets meet once a year and which is reserved for some of Berlin's closest allies, like Israel and France.

Merkel and other German politicians are due to take part in a solemn vigil at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on Tuesday. Muslim organisations called the event to remember the victims of Islamist militant attacks on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a kosher shop in Paris.

Davutoglu said it was important to combat all forms of Islamophobia in Germany. Nearly two in three of the four million Muslims in Germany are of Turkish origin. Roughly half are German citizens.

 

Recommended





Advertisement

Comments

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

Alert: If you are facing problems with posting comments, please note that you must verify your email with Disqus prior to posting a comment. follow this link to make sure your account meets the requirements. (http://bit.ly/vDisqus)

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

FOLLOW THIS ARTICLE

Interested in knowing more about this story?

Click here